Hundreds in Hebron for Torah Dedication, Chabad Event

Torah scroll rescued from Kristallnacht reinstated in Hebron during mega event.

13.3.18, 12:59
JLI - The Rohr Jewish Learning Institute of Chabad concluded their ten-day visit to Israel with an event in Hebron. About 100 Chabad emissaries (shluchim) from the United States, Canada and other countries, together with about 700 members of their communities came to the city on Monday March 12, 2018, in what some estimate to be the largest group from abroad in decades.
The closing event included a procession led by a Holocaust survivor with a special Torah scroll that survived Kristallnacht. 
In the evening, a spectacular multimedia presentation was screened on the walls of the Cave of Machpela, with accompanying a fireworks display and music.

About 100 Chabad emissaries (shluchim) from the United States, Canada and other countries, together with about 700...

Posted by Hebron Jewish Community and Biblical Heritage Site on Tuesday, March 13, 2018
Rabbi Efraim Mintz - Executive Director of JLI said that the day in Hebron was the most memorable of the trip. Speaking with Gil Hoffman on Inside Israel Today on The Land of Israel Network, he stated, "while the Western Wall and Jerusalem are clearly the highlights, the most inspiring part, ever single time we bring groups, is Hebron." 
He singled out Rabbi Danny and Rebbetzin Batsheva Cohen who run Chabad of Hebron and hosted the group. "They are a true symbol of dedication to the Jewish community. Just walking on the stones last night and visiting the Ma'arat HaMachpela (Tomb of Machpela) and the Avraham Avinu shul (synagogue).
Regarding the Torah scroll he added, "Mr. Leonard Wien, a member of our board, purchased the Torah from the family, restored it and donated it to JLI. We were fortunate to march with that very Toarh with close to 1,000 people, marching in the streets of Hebron to bring it to the place of Abraham and Sarah, the place that was and continues to be the source of inspiration of fellow Jews throughout history and for us today."
A 2017 article described the refurbishing of the Torah, which was hidden from the Nazis during World War II. A 14-year-old named Isaac Schwartz, ran into a burning synagogue in Hamburg, Germany and was able to save the Torah scroll. The event took place during the Kristallnacht riots of November 9, 1938. The Schwartz family buried the Torah scroll in their back yard before escaping the Holocaust by fleeing to Venezuela. After the war the were able to retrieve the scroll and it stayed in the family for years until they contacted businessman Leonard Wien who funded its restoration. Now the Torah scroll will be used at one of the local Chabad institutions in Hebron. 
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